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Dan Allen

Dan Allen

about 5 hours ago

As a result of showing respect, Hunter Hackett, Caden Saul, and Kaden DalPonte got to lead the varsity boys basketball team onto the court before last Friday's game. view image

Dan Allen

Dan Allen

4 days ago

Third graders in Mrs. Harpster's Class enjoyed STEM projects and science experiments on Valentines Day. The students designed towers from candy hearts, made predictions about how tall the towers might be, and built the towers to test their designs. The class also decided to experiment with dissolving candy hearts in five different liquids: water, white vinegar, rubbing alcohol, vegetable oil, and lemon juice. Again, they used prediction skills to determine which liquids might dissolve the candy, and which would be the fastest. The next day the fun continued when the students decided it would be interesting to mix the candy-colored liquids from the previous day. They hypothesized that the liquids, colored by the dissolved candy, would combine to create new colors.(Sidenote: Happy accident! Something really amazing was formed when lemon juice was added to the oil. It was so exciting that many students grabbed their iPads to snap photos. Some started videos and continued to record the great discussions that developed from the experimentation!) Their suspicions about creating new colors were only partially correct. The attempt to combine the liquids led to a discovery that oil and water do not mix because their density is not the same. The students thought about how this could apply in "real life' and came up with oil tankers spilling oil into the ocean. After several creative suggestions for removing oil from the ocean to protect its inhabitants, the kids gave it a try with the classroom model. They tried removing the oil with a straw, which didn't work. Using a Q-tip did work. Using this knowledge, they agreed they needed something larger with greater absorbency. Placing several layers of folded Kleenex onto the top of the oil and water resulted in the "oil spill's " disappearance and left a clean liquid. The class also used a volunteer to try to remove a handful of oil from her hands with only water. It didn't work, so soap was added. This resulted in oil-free hands. They compared this discovery to a commercial they had seen on television and discussed how this, too, could help creatures affected by oil spills. We are quite certain that the kids in Room 16 are destined to be scientists and environmentalists with this kind of thinking! view image

Dan Allen

Dan Allen

4 days ago

Third graders in Mrs. Harpster's Class enjoyed STEM projects and science experiments on Valentines Day. The students designed towers from candy hearts, made predictions about how tall the towers might be, and built the towers to test their designs. The class also decided to experiment with dissolving candy hearts in five different liquids: water, white vinegar, rubbing alcohol, vegetable oil, and lemon juice. Again, they used prediction skills to determine which liquids might dissolve the candy, and which would be the fastest. The next day the fun continued when the students decided it would be interesting to mix the candy-colored liquids from the previous day. They hypothesized that the liquids, colored by the dissolved candy, would combine to create new colors.(Sidenote: Happy accident! Something really amazing was formed when lemon juice was added to the oil. It was so exciting that many students grabbed their iPads to snap photos. Some started videos and continued to record the great discussions that developed from the experimentation!) Their suspicions about creating new colors were only partially correct. The attempt to combine the liquids led to a discovery that oil and water do not mix because their density is not the same. The students thought about how this could apply in "real life' and came up with oil tankers spilling oil into the ocean. After several creative suggestions for removing oil from the ocean to protect its inhabitants, the kids gave it a try with the classroom model. They tried removing the oil with a straw, which didn't work. Using a Q-tip did work. Using this knowledge, they agreed they needed something larger with greater absorbency. Placing several layers of folded Kleenex onto the top of the oil and water resulted in the "oil spill's " disappearance and left a clean liquid. The class also used a volunteer to try to remove a handful of oil from her hands with only water. It didn't work, so soap was added. This resulted in oil-free hands. They compared this discovery to a commercial they had seen on television and discussed how this, too, could help creatures affected by oil spills. We are quite certain that the kids in Room 16 are destined to be scientists and environmentalists with this kind of thinking!

Dan Allen

Dan Allen

4 days ago

Congratulations to the newest 2nd Grade member of the MIND (Math Is Not Difficult) Club! view image

Dan Allen

Dan Allen

4 days ago

Congratulations to the newest Fifth Grade member of the MIND (Math Is Not Difficult) Club! view image

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News

SES Cheers on the SHS Lady Redskins Basketball Team!

Click For Video One Click For Video Two Click for Video Three Click for Video Four......

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SES Children's Choir

Click for Video of the SES Children's Choir......

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4th and 5th Grade Children's Choir

The children's choir, fourth and fifth graders, recently sang at the senior center & Courtyard Estates. Directed by Melissa Haegen ......

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Events

SIP Day (No Student Attendance)

Mar 9

End of 3rd Quarter

Mar 9

PTO Donkey Basketball

Mar 22 at 7:00 PM

SIP Day (No Student Attendance)

Apr 13

Kindergarten Orientation

Apr 17 at 6:00 PM

PTO Family Fit Night @ SES Playgrounds

Apr 19 at 6:00 PM
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